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International Journal of Guidance and Counselling

Commentary - International Journal of Guidance and Counselling ( 2021) Volume 5, Issue 4

The Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

Bashira Chiyo*
 
Department of Education, Kanazawa University, Japan
 
*Corresponding Author:
Bashira Chiyo, Department of Education, Kanazawa University, Japan, Email: [email protected]

Received: 06-Dec-2021 Published: 27-Dec-2021

Introduction

Treatment may be helpful, and in many cases of anxiety, treatment is usually the most effective. This is because anxiety disorders — in contrast with anxiety disorders — treat more than just the symptoms of the problem. Treatment can help you identify the root causes of your anxiety and fears; learn to relax; look at situations in new, less frightening ways; and developing better problem-solving skills. Therapy gives you the tools to overcome anxiety and teaches you how to use it.

Anxiety disorders are very different, so treatment should be based on your specific symptoms and diagnosis. If you have obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), for example, your treatment will be different from someone who needs help with anxiety attacks. The duration of treatment will also depend on the type and severity of your anxiety disorder.

According to the American Psychological Association, most people progress significantly during an 8 to 10 treatment session.

Although many therapies are used to treat anxiety, the leading methods are cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure therapy. Each treatment for anxiety can be used alone, or combined with other therapies. Treatment for anxiety may be done individually, or it may occur in a group of people with similar anxiety disorders.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy (CBT) is a widely used treatment for anxiety disorders. Studies have shown that it is effective in treating dementia, phobias, social anxiety disorders, and general anxiety disorders, among many other conditions.

CBT deals with negative patterns and distortions in the way we look at the world and ourselves. As the name suggests, this involves two key elements:

Psychiatry examines how negative thoughts, or perceptions, contribute to anxiety. Behavioural therapy examines your behaviour and reacts to stressful situations. The basic premise of CBT is that our thoughts — not external events — affect how we feel. In other words, it is not the situation you are in that determines how you feel, but your attitude toward the situation.

For example, imagine that you have just been invited to a big party. Consider three different ways of thinking about the invitation, and how those ideas can affect your emotions.

Cognitive Behavioral therapy (CBT) is a widely used treatment for anxiety disorders. Studies have shown that it is effective in treating dementia, phobias, social anxiety disorders, and general anxiety disorders, among many other conditions.

CBT deals with negative patterns and distortions in the way we look at the world and ourselves. As the name suggests, this involves two key elements: Psychiatry examines how negative thoughts, or perceptions, contribute to anxiety.

Behavioural therapy examines your behaviour and reacts to stressful situations.

Acknowledgement

The authors are grateful to the journal editor for publishing the article in the respective journal.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

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